Research by Public Agenda, prepared for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Can I Get A Little Advice Here? Finding Four

"With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them" is the first of three reports describing young Americans' views on higher education and college completion. Coming at a time when the United States has slipped to tenth place in international college completion rates, these reports explore the issue directly from the student point of view. Based on a national survey of young adults, ages 22 to 30, this research dispels some common myths about why so many students do not graduate and details what kinds of changes -- by government, higher education, business and others -- might make a difference.

REPORT 1: Quick Links

\

DATA TO GO
Sort by:  

Share this study with your friends:
    
More reports on the way: sign up to be notified via e-mail or RSS, or get alerts via Twitter or Facebook.




FINDING No 4: Advisers at higher education institutions get better ratings, but there's room for improvement.

The young people surveyed here give somewhat more positive reviews to the advisors and counselors they encounter at the postsecondary level. Six in 10 give their college advisors "good" or "excellent" ratings for helping them decide what classes to take. The numbers are somewhat less positive for helping them understand how to get loans and scholarships; roughly half of the respondents give their counselors "good" or "excellent" ratings in this area, while about half rate them "fair" or "poor."

Colleges and universities also perform reasonably well. Eighty percent of the young adults give their schools "good" or "excellent" ratings for offering interesting courses, and 75 percent give the schools "good" or "excellent" ratings for their remedial programs. One result that should prompt some further research is that young people who do not believe that they were well counseled in high school are considerably less likely to give their college good reviews on remedial courses. Whereas 59 percent of the well-counseled students rated their college-level remedial programs as “excellent,” just 1 in 5 of the poorly counseled students say the same. It is not clear from this study whether these poor reviews stem from a mismatch between the student and the school—something that might be mitigated by better counseling—or whether these students have more severe academic shortfalls, something that counselors have limited powers to address.























Share this study with your friends:
    
More reports on the way: sign up to be notified via e-mail or RSS, or get alerts via Twitter or Facebook.




Can I Get A Little Advice Here? Finding Four

FINDING No 4: Advisers at higher education institutions get better ratings, but there's room for improvement.

The young people surveyed here give somewhat more positive reviews to the advisors and counselors they encounter at the postsecondary level. Six in 10 give their college advisors "good" or "excellent" ratings for helping them decide what classes to take. The numbers are somewhat less positive for helping them understand how to get loans and scholarships; roughly half of the respondents give their counselors "good" or "excellent" ratings in this area, while about half rate them "fair" or "poor."

Colleges and universities also perform reasonably well. Eighty percent of the young adults give their schools "good" or "excellent" ratings for offering interesting courses, and 75 percent give the schools "good" or "excellent" ratings for their remedial programs. One result that should prompt some further research is that young people who do not believe that they were well counseled in high school are considerably less likely to give their college good reviews on remedial courses. Whereas 59 percent of the well-counseled students rated their college-level remedial programs as “excellent,” just 1 in 5 of the poorly counseled students say the same. It is not clear from this study whether these poor reviews stem from a mismatch between the student and the school—something that might be mitigated by better counseling—or whether these students have more severe academic shortfalls, something that counselors have limited powers to address.